AMENITIES

Peterson Park provides a wealth of opportunities to enjoy the natural beauty that Door County has to offer. Beyond the ability to exercise, children can run and jump and swing, but more importantly, they can learn basic social skills, be creative and use their powers of imagination during play. Individuals or families of any age can also stay healthy and exercise anytime. The park is easily accessed from the YMCA parking lot, along 19th Place and at the intersection of Iowa Street and 19th Avenue.

 

Park features currently include:

  • KaBoom! Playground: Kaboom!, a national non-profit, partnered with Door County youth in 2015 to design and install a variety of playground equipment that borders 19th Place. The project received a generous donation from Baylake Bank and other Y volunteers assisted with the installation: a community-wide effort. 
  • Bathrooms: conveniently located next to the Kaboom! playground and cleaned daily.
  • Pavilion: located in close proximity to the playground and a great spot for lunch, picnics or parties.
  • Amphitheater: multiple seating levels and can accommodate presentations, exercise classes, wedding, recitals and other events.
  • Running/Walking Paths: three paved paths of varying lengths allow walkers and runners to safely exercise. 
  • Sports Fields: four natural grass sports fields allow for multiple events and groups.
  • Exercise Equipment: a variety of Greenfields Outdoor Fitness body-weight equipment is spaced throughout the park and is easily accessible via the walking loops:
  • Prairie Gardens/Natural Area: .75 acre diverse garden of small and tallgrass prairies and associated flowers that are great for pollinators and butterflies. There is also a border of over 65 trees around the park that attract a diverse range of birds and several nesting boxes that attract nesting bluebirds, tree swallows, black-capped chickadees and common wrens. The prairie garden not only provides unique prairie plant views that changes with the seasons, but it is also an educational opportunity for youth and adults alike.

April 24, 2021 Update

In fall 2020, a number of plugs were planted to increase the diversity of spring flowers in the garden:

  • Prairie Smoke, a new species to the park, is doing well and features several plants that are flowering (denoted by reddish/pink flowers). In a couple of years, as they spread out, there will be a point each spring that the withering flowers create hairy features that will appear like smoke over the prairie.
  • Hairy Golden Aster, also newly introduced to the park, looks like it survived the winter well.
  • Pearly Everlasting is an early bloomer and will have a pearly white color; it looks to be thriving.
  • June Grass features a tuft of grass near the brown wire and another in the background.  Most prairie grasses don't bloom until mid to late summer, but June grass blooms in June.
  • Bush's Coneflower is a native species to the region but is typically found a little further south - Illinois and Missouri - and has a yellow flower instead of the usual purple/pink. 

Prairie Smoke, a new species to the park, is doing well and features several plants that are flowering (denoted by reddish/pink flowers). In a couple of years, as they spread out, there will be a point each spring that the withering flowers create hairy f
Prairie Smoke features several plants that are flowering (denoted by reddish/pink flowers). In a few years, each spring the withering flowers will create hairy features that will appear like smoke over the prairie.

 

June Grass features a tuft of grass near the brown wire and another in the background.  Most prairie grasses don't bloom until mid to late summer, but June grass blooms in June.
June Grass features a tuft of grass near the brown wire and another in the background.  Most prairie grasses don't bloom until mid to late summer, but June grass blooms in June.

 

Hairy Golden Aster, also newly introduced to the park, looks like it survived the winter well.
Hairy Golden Aster looks like it survived the winter well.

 

Bush's Coneflower is a native species to the region but is typically found a little further south - Illinois and Missouri - and has a yellow flower instead of the usual purple/pink. 
Bush's Coneflower is a native species to the region but is typically found a little further south - Illinois and Missouri - and has a yellow flower instead of the usual purple/pink.

 

Pearly Everlasting is an early bloomer and will have a pearly white color; it looks to be thriving.
Pearly Everlasting is an early bloomer and will have a pearly white color; it looks to be thriving.